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Help for survival snare use

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1 Help for survival snare use on Sat Jan 21, 2012 9:17 am

PalmettoArcher

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Green Horn
As I mentioned in my introduction, I am new to bushcraft and am grateful to learn more each day from experienced outdoorsmen. I am an accomplished archer but have come to terms with the fact that I may not have the luxury of bow and arrow with me in a survival situation. I am therefore, currently focusing on the use of snares for survival/hunting scenarios. I would like to hear from those experienced with the selection and use of snares. I would actually like to meet up with brothers who could share their expertise in some practical hands-on experience. Anyone else in the GA, NC, SC, TN area interested in a meet and greet learning opportunity?

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2 Re: Help for survival snare use on Sat Jan 21, 2012 9:39 am

RangerXanatos

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Green Horn
I have never used a snare in application, but there are videos out there that can show you how to make and place a snare. Use wire around 24 gauge (doesn't have to be 24 gauge exactly but somewhere in the neighborhood)In my kit, I have some green floral wire that does the job. Take a piece around 2 feet long and on one end wrap two time the last 1.5 inches around a small stick. With the last 1 inch of wire sticking out, wrap around the longer end of the wire by twisting the stick in on it's axis. Break the stick in half and stick the other end of the wire through the two small loops where your stick used to be. You now have a snare. What you want to snare will determine the size of the head loop and the placement of the snare. A fist sized loop for rabbit and 4 fingers for squirrels. Rabbits you will want to funnel into the snare on their trails and squirrels you will want to make a squirrel pole for them to run up into their tree.

I'm always interested in a local meet. I know of a trail on in National Forest where GA, SC, and NC all meet. Look up Ellicott Rock on the Chattooga River Trail.

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3 Re: Help for survival snare use on Sun Jan 22, 2012 7:21 am

Canukian


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I'll start by saying I'm not an expert on this matter by any means! I will always welcome the advice and constructive criticism of others. I have, however had successful results in snaring rabits in the past. As it was taught to me: use 22-24 gauge brass wire. Carefully chose a location where you can see frequent signs of your target species. (I would look for a worn path leading into a "funneled" area of brush or cover) in that funnel area, I would find a place where the tracks all converge to one single lane. A couple inches off the ground I would place a wire snare with a loop the size of my fist. I would secure the other end to a substantial branch/stick, and place small sticks around the snare to guide the rabbit into my snare. I set a few snares at a time in areas as described, and checked them REGULARLY (This was all done during winter months) I have never set a spring snare, and I was worried about a predator capitalizing on my catch, although I never had that happen.
I don't have any photos, but there are enough of them around I'm sure.
The area I currently live in does not allow the use of snares, so I'm out of practice but I don't remember it being all that difficult. The Internet and books show instructions on how to construct the snare loops, but in my experience, the location is more important that the design of the snare itself.
If I get a chance to legally practice this again this winter, I will get some photos and post them.
Good luck!

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4 Re: Help for survival snare use on Thu Jan 26, 2012 9:18 am

PalmettoArcher

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Green Horn
Well, I've been doing a little online research and found a treasure trove of trapping/snaring information. From Project Gutenburg, I have found this treatise:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17093/17093-h/17093-h.htm

The beauty of old texts is the discovery of how much information has been lost between generations.

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